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Community Supported History

Published on Wednesday, September 09, 2015 By Melissa Prycer
For many, September is a time of new beginnings—freshly sharpened pencils, fresh notebooks, and a backpack still in one piece! We at Dallas Heritage Village are also looking forward to some new beginnings: work continues on the Fisher Road Bathrooms. Details are being finalized for fall events. And as the weather cools, we’re looking forward to seeing old and new friends at the Village. But it’s also a time to reflect on our past year of activities. Our fiscal year ends September 30, so we’ve also been asking you, our friends, partners and supporters, to consider making an annual gift. My very first museum job was at a historic site fully funded by the county government. Everything we did was free to the public, and at the end of the year, there w ..

Why I Drive 800 Miles per Week to Intern at DHV

Published on Friday, August 07, 2015 By Melissa Prycer
(/images/postimages/DSCN18691-e1438965720166.jpg) By Coleman Hamptom, Baylor Museum Studies Student Most Texans are familiar with the bumper car style of driving on I-35. Long stretches of smooth sailing and verdant views can quickly become what feels like a Nascar race with 18 wheelers and Corvettes jockeying for ideal position. The interstate’s span from our border with Mexico all the way to Canada is 1,695 miles. I drive that far in two weeks on my daily commute to DHV from Waco…and back. Everyone said I was crazy for choosing a summer internship in Dallas (which counts for six hours graduate credit at Baylor). I heard, “You should find something closer to Waco, man”, or, “I’d find somewhere to stay in Dallas if I were you.” M ..

(Re)Introducing our Taproots Programs

Published on Monday, June 22, 2015 By Melissa Prycer
The definition of a taproot is the large main root of a plant that grows vertically downward and bears small lateral roots. It is a strong root that creates a network that is all connected. This definition is part of what is inspiring us to bring back the Taproot programs to Dallas Heritage Village. With all of the news of change and progress in the Cedars neighborhood, the excitement at the Village is palpable. We want to redevelop this program as a way to foster our connections, “roots” if you will, with our neighborhood and support each other’s development. What are these programs you might ask? These new programs are the innovation of our Family Programs Manager, Johna Davis. The programs are a way of creating a sort of Visiting Artists program and bringi ..

April Showers… Bring Wildflowers to the Village

Published on Monday, June 22, 2015 By Melissa Prycer
March, April, and May are the prime blooming months in Texas, and my favorite time of the year. This is where the browned grass turns into a lush green, and a myriad of colorful wildflowers and vegetation starts appearing. Here at The Village we are lucky to have examples of the entire magnificent flora that a Texas spring has to offer. Starting in March, our visitors and staff had the privilege of witnessing our white, yellow, and violet irises. Now in April, our valley has been speckled with Texans’ favorite wildflower, the bluebonnet. of course, and a few other varieties of wildflowers. I am not sure if you all are aware of this, but Texas has over 5,000 native species of flowering plants. This is due to the multitude of plant habitats and weather conditions thro ..

Lessons from the Feathered and Furry

Published on Monday, June 22, 2015 By Melissa Prycer
There are lots of things you can learn here at DHV, but some of my best teachers are our non-human staff members. I try to apply their life lessons every day. Our sheep, Winston, Starbuck and MaBelle, frequently demonstrate the dangers of panicking under pressure. They are cute, and friendly, and make nice wool, but their limited brains are focused on food and avoiding death. They fear everything. Their only weapons are fleeing and staying together. Any sudden movement, however benign, and they close ranks and run–sometimes in exactly the wrong direction. They spend too much of their time suffering from unnecessary anxiety, and I now watch myself to avoid the pitfall of needless fretting. Chicken brains are a lot like sheep brains, only smaller. They also know safety lie ..

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