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Community Supported History

Published on Wednesday, September 09, 2015 By Melissa Prycer
For many, September is a time of new beginnings—freshly sharpened pencils, fresh notebooks, and a backpack still in one piece! We at Dallas Heritage Village are also looking forward to some new beginnings: work continues on the Fisher Road Bathrooms. Details are being finalized for fall events. And as the weather cools, we’re looking forward to seeing old and new friends at the Village. But it’s also a time to reflect on our past year of activities. Our fiscal year ends September 30, so we’ve also been asking you, our friends, partners and supporters, to consider making an annual gift. My very first museum job was at a historic site fully funded by the county government. Everything we did was free to the public, and at the end of the year, there w ..

The Annual Campaign for the Future

Published on Monday, September 09, 2013 By Melissa Prycer
(/images/postimages/annual-campaign.jpg) Several important things happen in September each year. Other than the reopening of schools, the start of football season, and the beginning of cooler (ha!) temperatures, that is. It is the Annual Campaign for the Future for Dallas Heritage Village. Why do we have an annual campaign for support, and why in the world do we have it in September? Taking the second question first: our fiscal year ends on September 30, so this is the month where we close out the books for this year and adopt our budget for the next year. Our fiscal year happens to match that of the City of Dallas, our partner in this museum venture, and it is a hold-over from the days when the vast majority of our funding came from the City. These days, while we sti ..

Balancing Act

Published on Wednesday, October 19, 2011 By Melissa Prycer
In two previous blog posts I talked about our fund raising efforts as we closed out our fiscal year (September 30). I can now report that we have had a successful financial year and have finished “in the black” for the second year in succession. In these troubled economic times, we consider this quite a feat! As for our End of Year Campaign, we raised approximately $75,000, falling short of our $85,000 goal. Despite this shortfall, we were very pleased to raise $75,000, and relieved that we were able to raise this amount of money during a month where the stock market was in free fall. To all of our donors who braved a very turbulent month and still donated $75,000 to our campaign, we are eternally grateful! So, how did we fall short of our c ..

It’s Time

Published on Wednesday, August 24, 2011 By Melissa Prycer
My first long-term museum job (meaning that I wasn’t just there for the summer) was at a historic farm in North Carolina. Historic Oak View County Park was fully funded by Wake County, which meant everything we did was free to visitors—admission, school tours, special events. Occasionally, we even got magical phone calls at the end of the fiscal year: “You have to spend X dollars in the next two weeks.” It was all very, very nice. When I started working at Dallas Heritage Village, it took me a little while to adjust to a very different funding structure. As Gary has discussed previously (/blog/To-our-Trustees-Members-Neighbors-Friends-and-Constituents-Why-We-Need-Your-Support), our budget is made up of all kinds of revenue streams, including a ..

To our Trustees, Members, Neighbors, Friends, and Constituents : Why We Need Your Support

Published on Tuesday, August 16, 2011 By Melissa Prycer
To our Trustees, Members, Neighbors, Friends, and Constituents : Why We Need Your Support Previously I discussed the impact of state government cuts on museums around the country, including Texas. Since I wrote that essay, I have attended the Texas Association of Museums annual meeting, where I visited with colleagues and picked up more stores of what is happening in other states. The news is not good. Clearly, we are in an era where government support for history, culture, and the arts is on a long-term decline. Government funding is important, because it is generally allocated for operations support such as utilities, salaries, maintenance—the kind of things that other funders are reluctant to support. If government support is on a long-term decline,  ..

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