What does Millermore mean?

Published on Monday, January 11, 2016 By Melissa Prycer
As we celebrate the 50th anniversary of Millermore’s close brush with destruction and rebirth as the first building in our museum, I contemplate what this house means. It means more than will fit in one blog. Millermore has been gathering layers of meaning for 160 years. It took the first 7 years to build the container for those meanings. For William Brown Miller and his (/images/postimages/cabin-interior.jpg) The Miller cabin was cozy but cramped. family in a lonely young settlement, that big house finished in 1861 was a mark on the land, signifying their success. Have you seen their cabin? It is smaller than one room in the new house! It is made of logs, a frontier embarrassment for respectable people who thought they should live in a refined manner. Or m ..

Candlelight Photo Contest

Published on Wednesday, November 11, 2015 By Melissa Prycer
Dallas Heritage Village is always a picture perfect kind of place, but never more so than at Candlelight. So, this year for Candlelight, our theme is Picture Perfect Candlelight. We have thousands of fabulous Candlelight photos in our photo archive, but we want to see some of your photos! So, beginning this week, we’re asking you to join in our Picture Perfect Candlelight photo contest. (/images/postimages/CL2014_BM105.gif) Post one of your favorite photos on your preferred social media forum (Facebook, Twitter or Instagram) from a past Candlelight. Do you have a great picture of Nip and Tuck? Did your family pose with some of our giant packages on the front porch of Millermore? Is there a photo of you performing with one of our many choirs? The options  ..

Reflections on Twenty Years at Dallas Heritage Village

Published on Wednesday, November 04, 2015 By Melissa Prycer
(/images/postimages/Gary_BW-001.jpg) After twenty years, my departure from Dallas Heritage Village has been so gradual that it is hard to say just when my last day was. But it is certainly evident that the leadership succession plan that Melissa Prycer and I worked out two years ago has already been a terrific success. Melissa hit the ground running from her first days as Interim Director, and by the time she was named President and Executive Director almost 18 months ago, she was operating at full speed. While my official last day is obscured, I can certainly remember my first day at DHV (then Old City Park) on the Monday after Thanksgiving in 1995. Before I had even poured my first cup of coffee I had plunged into the groundbreaking festivities surrounding the new Chaut ..

Little Visitors

Published on Monday, September 28, 2015 By Melissa Prycer
Ten years ago, back when I was Curator of Education, I launched Nip and Tuck’s Barnyard Buddies Storytime for Preschoolers (/programs/childrens-programs/barnyard-buddies). It was our first official foray into preschool programming, and it was (and continues to be!) so much fun. We’re a big place, and it’s important to sometimes boil down all we offer into one building or one story. Barnyard Buddies lets us do that–plus, our audience is adorable and very easily impressed. (/) At a conference the next year, a colleague at another museum heard what we were doing. His comment: “Why on earth are you doing preschool programming? Kids that age don’t understand the difference between last week and next week, much less History. You shouldn ..

DHV Farmstead in High Cotton

Published on Monday, September 14, 2015 By Melissa Prycer
“In High Cotton” is one of those wonderful old southern phrases that may not be used much these days. If you are in high cotton, you are doing well, maybe even rolling in wealth, because your cotton crop is so tall you can harvest without stooping, and the price for cotton is high. Now, high is a relative term, and if you must be precise, the cotton crop at our farmstead is only high if the picker is two feet tall. But, our plants sprouted, and grew, and didn’t die, and they are making little bolls of cotton, which feel a lot like cotton balls but firmer and spelled differently. Our little urban garden is not always successful, so we will count this as a win. The price of cotton is irrelevant. They don’t buy it by the ounce. We only have 13 plants.  ..

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