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How to Enjoy your Visit During Field Trip Season

Published on Wednesday, May 04, 2016 By Caitlin Hughes
April and May are always hectic months for any museum that hosts field trips. We see 1/3 of school children for the year in these months alone. The gift shop is constantly reordering “kid friendly” souvenirs. Bathrooms are monitored around the clock. All frontline staff put in extra shifts and eagerly await some vacation time in June and July. While these days are extremely busy, they are also some of our favorites. At Dallas Heritage Village students participate on self-guided field trips in small groups with an aid of a History Hunt and a chaperone. This History Hunt can be one of five possible themes which are designed to engage the students at a deeper level within our houses, asking them to interpret what they are seeing. At the Village we also have 13 acres a ..

The 1960’s, not the 1860’s!

Published on Wednesday, March 30, 2016 By Melissa Prycer
In 1966 a group of intrepid ladies got together and saved Millermore. Our Junior Historians created a reenactment of this seminal event, which can be found at http://dallasheritagevillage.blueervay.com/supporters/millermore (/supporters/millermore) . This marked the beginning of what would become Dallas Heritage Village. Fifty years is a milestone worth celebrating, and the Village intends to do just that…Celebrate! As we move into spring our next big celebration is History with a Twist on April 30, 2016 presented by Sidley Austin LLP. This is our biggest fundraiser of the year! Twist is usually a jazz age, 20’s themed cocktail party. However, this year, in honor of our founding, DHV is flashing forward to the 60’s. I know that is a little beyond the Village&rsq ..

The Sullivan House Sends Encouraging Words to a Friend

Published on Wednesday, March 09, 2016 By Melissa Prycer
Dear Blue House at 1423 Griffin, formerly 285 Browder I hear that you will soon be adding a new address to your history-by moving to another lot in the Cedars. The same thing happened to me, over 25 years ago, and a few of my joints still ache, but it is better than the wrecking ball. You and I were born in the same era of beautiful Victorian houses. We nurtured people. I know that you lost one of your humans to a tragic car accident. One of my young residents drowned—it was hard to accept that he would never again slam my front door and bound up my stairs. But, we are sturdy and made to outlast humans. I hear that you have been fortunate enough to lure some into spending their money, which they value highly, on moving you and putting you back together. Even some of  ..

Reflections on Twenty Years at Dallas Heritage Village

Published on Wednesday, November 04, 2015 By Melissa Prycer
(/images/postimages/Gary_BW-001.jpg) After twenty years, my departure from Dallas Heritage Village has been so gradual that it is hard to say just when my last day was. But it is certainly evident that the leadership succession plan that Melissa Prycer and I worked out two years ago has already been a terrific success. Melissa hit the ground running from her first days as Interim Director, and by the time she was named President and Executive Director almost 18 months ago, she was operating at full speed. While my official last day is obscured, I can certainly remember my first day at DHV (then Old City Park) on the Monday after Thanksgiving in 1995. Before I had even poured my first cup of coffee I had plunged into the groundbreaking festivities surrounding the new Chaut ..

DHV Farmstead in High Cotton

Published on Monday, September 14, 2015 By Melissa Prycer
“In High Cotton” is one of those wonderful old southern phrases that may not be used much these days. If you are in high cotton, you are doing well, maybe even rolling in wealth, because your cotton crop is so tall you can harvest without stooping, and the price for cotton is high. Now, high is a relative term, and if you must be precise, the cotton crop at our farmstead is only high if the picker is two feet tall. But, our plants sprouted, and grew, and didn’t die, and they are making little bolls of cotton, which feel a lot like cotton balls but firmer and spelled differently. Our little urban garden is not always successful, so we will count this as a win. The price of cotton is irrelevant. They don’t buy it by the ounce. We only have 13 plants.  ..

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